Gum Disease Prevention With Raisins

Gum Disease Prevention With Raisins

For those of us with a sweet tooth, there is good news on the dental front. Despite the fact that raisins are sweet and sticky, scientists at the University of Illinois in Chicago have found them to contain compounds that prevent tooth decay and gingivitis.

There are a number of constituents in raisins that address the problem of plaque-causing bacteria in the mouth. Some, like oleanolic acid are very good at killing these bacteria. Oleanolic acid, oleanolic aldehyde, and 5-(hydroxy methyl)-2-furfural also reduce the ability of these bacteria to grow. In particular, they work against Streptococcus mutans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Oleanolic acid is also effective at preventing the bacteria Streptococcus mutans from sticking to the surface of the tooth, The bacteria need to stick to the teeth to form plaque, after which they start eroding the tooth enamel. Sucrose, not the fructose and glucose that raisins have in them, are what creates the environment for tooth decay.

Cranberries have also been found to prevent bacteria (specifically Streptococcus mutans) from sticking to teeth, and causing gum disease and tooth decay. There are now dental floss products and toothpastes in the US that contain cranberry extract. And the British Dental Health Foundation is recommending cranberry extracts and juice to prevent tooth decay and associated problems. But because of cranberry juice’s acidity, they recommend only taking it at mealtimes. Acidic food and drinks temporarily soften the enamel on teeth.

Symptoms of gum disease include red and swollen gums that bleed easily, tooth sensitivity, spaces developing between teeth, pus between teeth, chronic bad breath, pain in the mouth, and changes to the bite of teeth. Plaque is the main cause of gum disease, though other factors can speed up the process of gum degradation. These include smoking, a genetic predisposition, pregnancy, puberty, stress, poor diet (and yo-yo dieting wouldn’t help), medications like anti-depressants, and oral contraceptives, grinding teeth at night, diabetes, and some other systemic diseases.

References:

1. www.perio.org

2. www.nutraingredients.com/news/ng.asp?id=60518

3. www.nutraingredients.com/news/ng.asp?id=56744

Pulling Your Own Teeth

Pulling Your Own Teeth

Even though it may sound very odd and downright compelling, a lot of people actually try to extract their own teeth. Toothache pain can be very painful and very frustrating, making you try anything to get relief. Depending on how bad the pain is, you’ll be more than willing to do just about anything you can to get the pain to stop. Abscesses or really bad cavities are among the worst, as the pain never seems to let up – no matter what you do.

In the old days, teeth were extracted by pliers, as there were no dentists around. During these times, people would get drunk on alcohol and then the teeth would be extracted. There was no such thing as anaesthesia back then, so it was impossible to locally numb the pain. These days though, local anaesthesia is the best way to numb a toothache before pulling the tooth. If you attempt to pull a tooth yourself, you’ll feel the pain no matter what you do.

There are situations however, in which you can pull your own teeth. Baby teeth for example, are acceptable to pull. Before you yank it out though, you should check on the age of when the tooth in question should be removed. If you wiggle the tooth around and it appears to be loose, then chances are it will come out without a problem. On the other hand, if you pull the tooth and it turns out to be an abscess, you’ll end up with a real problem and your hands and you’ll need to visit a dentist as soon as you can.

Another situation in which it is acceptable to pull your own teeth is when you have a severe case of gum disease. Gum disease can cause the socket and the bone to become extremely decayed, which will result in the destruction of the tooth. If the gum disease is severe enough, the tooth will be extremely loose and will come out without a problem. In some cases, the tooth can be almost unbearable to the touch. If you have gum disease and notice a loose tooth, you should be careful when pulling it. If you don’t do it properly or if you do it too soon, you could end up breaking the top of the tooth. If this happens, you’ll need to go to the dentist to have the remaining portion of the tooth cut out.

Even though a tooth may feel loose when you touch it, doesn’t always mean that you can grab a pair of pliers and rip it out. Teeth are very delicate. If you try to rip a tooth out with pair of pliers and make a mistake, you should end up doing more harm than good. Putting pliers in your mouth can also lead to an infection, which would send you to the dentist. Abscesses on the other hand, should never be dealt with on your own – you’ll need to go to a dentist to have him properly extract the tooth and give you some antibiotics to stop the infection.

To be on the safe side and avoid any potential problems that could easily arise, you should always go to the dentist if you have a toothache. No matter how bad the pain may be, you should never attempt to pull the tooth yourself. Your dentist can numb the area before he pulls the tooth, so you’ll feel no pain at all. He will also prescribe you some pain medicine and antibiotics as well, to help treat any infection you may have. If you attempt to pull the tooth yourself, you’ll only cause more problems in the end – and end up going to a dentist anyway.

Nutritional Cure for Gum Disease

Nutritional Cure for Gum Disease

Periodontal disease or popularly known as gum disease affects one in every three individual who are over 30 years of age in the United States. Gum disease in the inflammation of the gums by which could lead to tooth loss or even heart disease. The most common symptom of gum disease is the bleeding or pain of the gums. However some periodontal disease does not inhibit pain making the individual unaware that he or she already has gum disease. As a matter of fact, gum disease is responsible for more tooth loss to individuals who are over 30 than dental cavities.
However, nutritional cure for gum disease may be possible. Eating foods rich in vitamin C can help relieve gum disease because vitamin C is an antioxidant. Also, vitamin C can lower the risk of developing severe gingivitis. It is well known among dental professionals that vitamin C and gum disease are related. Vitamin C is needed to repair the connective fibers and it also hastens the regeneration of the damaged bone.
Another nutritional cure for gum disease is vitamin D. vitamin D has some anti-inflammatory properties that helps soothes the inflamed gums. Also, recent studies show that high vitamin D level in the blood can lessen the bleeding of the gums. Sun exposure is one of the most abundant sources of vitamin D. Experts recommend a total of 10 to 15 minutes of exposure done twice weekly can meet the recommended amount of vitamin D.
Folic acid is also a nutritional cure for gum disease. Folic acid when taken in a form of a capsule can be very effective. Rinsing the mouth with a folic acid solution can also reduce the bleeding and inflammation of the gums. On the other hand, folic acid in capsule form has no effect on pregnant women who have gum disease. Only the mouthwash solution is effective on pregnant women.
Some doctors recommend calcium as a nutritional cure for gum disease. A 500 milligram intake of calcium twice a day in a span of six months can reduce the symptoms of gum disease. Although calcium can reduce the bleeding of the gums and tooth loss, it has little effect on most cases.
Cranberry juice is a good nutritional cure for gum disease. Cranberries helps fight gum disease by preventing bacteria from sticking on the teeth. A recommended four ounces of cranberry juice a day is sufficient enough to prevent gum disease.
Experts recommend that you consult your doctor for proper nutritional cure for gum disease to prevent any complication on the gum disease. Follow the doctor’s advice and visit your dentist regularly to monitor the progress of the gum problem. Remember, gum disease may and can lead to heart problems. Take good care of your gums to have a healthy heart.

Crowing About Toothache

Crowing About Toothache

When you take care of the natural teeth in your mouth, there will be no toothache to crow about. Toothache refers to the pain caused by tooth or jaw problems such as dental cavity, a cracked tooth, an exposed tooth root, gum disease, disease of the jaw joint, or muscle spasms when chewing. The severity of a toothache can range from mild to chronic excruciating pain. The pain may be aggravated by chewing, cold, or hot temperature of food or liquids taken through the mouth. Dental x-rays can help determine the cause whether the toothache is coming from a tooth or jaw problem.
It is possibility that a toothache may be caused by a problem not originating from a tooth or the jaw. Pain around the teeth and the jaws can be symptoms of diseases of the heart such as angina or heart attack, ear infections, and even a sinus infection. The pain of angina is usually located in the chest or the arm. However, in some patients with angina, a toothache or jaw pain are the only symptoms of their heart problem. Since infections and diseases of the ears and sinuses can also cause pain around the teeth and jaws, evaluations by both dentists and doctors become necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing “toothache.”
Dental cavity is the most common cause of toothache. Dental cavities are holes in the two outer layers of a tooth called the enamel and the dentin. These layers serve to protect the inner lining of the tooth tissue called the pulp, where blood vessels and nerves reside. Bacterial infections in the mouth convert simple sugars into acid which softens and dissolves the enamel and dentin, thus, creating cavities. Small shallow cavities usually do not cause pain and may be unnoticed by the patient. It is the larger deeper cavity that becomes irritated by bacterial toxins when food debris collect causing toothache. Foods that are cold, hot, sour, or sweet can also cause pain.
Dental filling is usually the treatment for small and shallow cavities, while larger cavity involves an on-lay or crown. For cavities that have penetrated and injured the pulp, treatment requires either a root canal procedure or extraction of the affected tooth. Pulp injury can lead to the death of pulp tissue, resulting in tooth infection or dental abscess. The root canal procedure involves removing the dying pulp tissue and replacing it with an inert material to save the dying tooth from extraction.
Gum disease or gingivitis is considered to be the second most common cause of toothache characterized by the inflammation of the soft tissue and abnormal loss of bone that surrounds the teeth and holds them in place. This condition is caused by toxins secreted by bacteria in “plaque” that accumulate over time along the gum line. Gum bleeding without pain is an early symptom of this disease while pain is of more advanced gum disease symptom as the loss of bone around the teeth leads to the formation of gum pockets. Advanced gum disease can cause loss of otherwise healthy teeth.
Early gum disease is treatment involves oral hygiene and removal of bacterial plaque. Thorough cleaning of the teeth and teeth roots called “root planing” and “subgingival curettage.” Root planing is the removal of plaque and tartar from exposed teeth roots while subgingival curettage refers to the removal of the surface of the inflamed layer of gum tissue. Both of these procedures are usually performed under local anesthesia and may be accompanied by the use of oral antibiotics to overcome gum infection or abscess. Follow-up treatment may include various types of gum surgeries. In advanced gum disease with significant bone destruction and loosening of teeth, teeth splinting or teeth extractions may be necessary.